Lochnagar via The Stuic

Retro walk: 19th May 2004

Lochnagar 19/07/04
Munros: Cac Carn Beag
Accomplices: Brian, Paul

This was retrospectively my first Munro, since a few days later, myself and Paul decided to take up munro-bagging. It wasn’t the first time I’d climbed it, but we took a more interesting route than usual (courtesy of Ralph Storer) by starting from Invercauld bridge near Braemar. The weather was fair, so Brian was sporting a rather fetching outfit of faded green Speedo shorts, brand new boots and shiny grey hiking socks which he pulled up as high as they would go. The look was completed with a black t-shirt bearing a large picture of Strongbad (Long story). Needless to say, he made Paul and myself look like a couple of rank amateurs.

Brian shows us how style is done

After a quick photo shoot, we set off down the road from Keiloch and across the A93, crossing the old Invercauld Bridge into Ballochbuie Forest. So began the long slog up out of the forest, made much more pleasant by the fact it is a beautiful place to be. With a wee stop for photos on a wooden observation platform below the Falls of Garbh Allt and a couple more for Brian to take on oxygen we eventually emerged at the deer fence that marks the edge of the forest. The occasion was marked by squirting my platypus hose at Brian’s groin in the hope of a passer-by spotting his wet patch.

He didn’t put up much of a fight

We continued up the path for a short distance, before dropping down to our left to cross the Feindallacher Burn and climb the rise of Druim Odhar. This was followed by the usual off-piste heather bashing, peat hag-skirting antics until we reached the banks of the Allt Lochan nan Eun where we picked up a stalker’s path to make the going slightly easier up towards Sandy Loch. All the while, the Stuic began to reveal itself to our right, with Cac Carn Beag of Lochnagar our eventual target ahead.

Looking highly impressed with the complete lack of a path
The Stuic

Brian and Paul wanted to peel away early to get to the base of the Stuic directly so we began the slightly-longer-than-you-think haul up to Loch nan Eun. Upon reaching the loch, the rain came in, putting our scrambling ambitions in jeopardy. We settled down out of the wind behind some rocks to eat a bit of lunch and the rain soon tailed off, leaving us free to begin our ascent.

Paul, the sun and Loch nan Eun

The Stuic looks quite imposing from the base, but Ralph’s book had assured us it was only a grade 1 scramble so up we went, the rock drying quickly under the reappearing sun. After the initial grassy/stony climb, this was a great scramble and we were soon stripping off our wet weather gear and stopping to admire the breathtaking views across to Ben Avon and the rest of the Cairngorms. Despite the narrow profile of the Stuic it is an easy climb to the top with lots of hands-on moments, but no major exposure, making for an ideal introduction to the world of scrambling. Brian, who had been flagging at the base, suddenly got his eighth wind once the going got vertical and used his non-existent sense of self-preservation to find the more eccentric routes of ascent.

Brian’s energy always returns when a path goes vertical
Cliffhanger it ain’t
Majestic conqueror of about 1/4 of the climb
Paul on camera duties
Leading the way
This joke never gets old. Never
Never
Across to Ben Avon and Beinn a Bhuird

To reach the top of lochnagar was simply a case of following the path round the top of Corrie Lochan nan Eun, striking for the top of Cac Carn Mor, then onwards to Cac Carn Beag. Unfortunately, Paul and myself neglected to tick off Carn a’ Choire Bhoideach on the way, not yet realising that were going to be munroists. After dragging Brian up the hundred metre climb, we diverted to walk along the cliff tops above Corrie of Lochnagar and posed for the obligatory photos atop either side of Black Spout (Easily amused) before continuing to the summit.

Ruining the view
Luckily not too gusty
Cac Carn Beag summit trig over to The Stuic
More food

After another wee lunch break, with views across to the Stuic and the striking green waters of Loch nan Eun, we began our descent of the north west ridge of Lochnagar, which was mostly boulder field – making hard going for Brian’s rapidly failing knees!

The way down
Another Stuic viewy
Dodging showers all the way
Still sunny at Loch nan Eun

Eventually, the banks of Sandy Loch were reached allowing us to retrace our steps back down to Ballochbuie forest and Keiloch car park. This is definitely the best way to experience Lochnagar, short of getting into proper rock climbing and gave us all the scrambling bug for future escapades.

Slightly more direct return involved some improvisation